Fab Finds in Genealogy for the Week of December 18, 2011

more suitcases

It seems that folks enjoyed last week’s post of fab genealogy finds, so here it is again with Fab Finds in Genealogy for the week ending December 18, 2011.

In the Genealogy Community:

Michael Hait presents an interesting argument that the online community is replacing the traditional local community in The Genealogy Paradigm Shift: Are bloggers the new “experts”? The question is: Is this good, or bad, for genealogy in the long run? It seems Michael’s opinion is that it is detrimental, especially to the societies that have provided so much research support in the past. What do you think? I’m really curious to see how the geneablogger community responds to this one.

The loss of access to the Social Security Death Index continues to stir within the genealogy community. Kimberly Powell writes a compelling article entitled “Genealogy Sites Pressured Into Removing SSDI” in which she is justifiably concerned: “If major genealogy companies aren’t going to fight for genealogists’ access to publicly available records, who is?

GeneaWebinars.com was just awarded a 2011 Geneablog award by Tamura Jones. You go Myrt!

Speaking of Myrt, she just brought to my attention a website I had not previously known existed: Historic Pathways by Elizabeth Shown Mills. I’m sure you’ll be as amazed as I was when I first perused it. There’s talk over on  Facebook of a potential study group in Second Life to review each of the articles.

Don’t forget to check out the 5 newest genealogy blogs spotted at Geneabloggers. Spread the geneablogger love and leave a welcome comment for these new bloggers.

In the News:

Genealogical and historical societies take note of the potential described here: “Rare 1904 cookbook helping historical society.” Enough said.

Three Genealogy Powerhouses Join Forces to Publish 1940 US Census

MyHeritage unveiled its mobile app, available for free on iPhone, iPad, and Android, “ideal for people to impress their relatives with their family tree and photos at family gatherings.” The app automatically syncs to users’ family sites on MyHeritage.com. I only wish my family were that easily impressed — but I will try it out — hey, you never know. Besides. It’s free.

More genealogy documents were saved from the abyss this week as a package mailed 33 years ago from Atlanta headed for Anchorage is finally recovered. I thought the post can be slow at times, but 33 years takes the cake.

Another set of documents and pictures that were found in an old suitcase are attempting to make their way back to the family of Frank and Betty McClure. And now I have an excuse to purchase every old suitcase I find in antique shops.

Two canadian researchers are asking an interesting question: What is the true cost of digging up our roots?  Even though I try to ignore that question as I diligently search for my own ancestors, I’ll be very interested to read their results once they are published.

Genealogy Videos:

Here’s a very cool video giving a visual representation of the evolution of newspapers in the U.S. from 1690 until the present posted by GenealogyGems.  At only 3.5 minutes long it is quite amazing to watch.

For lots of giggles and a fresh dose of holiday spirit, watch Sheri Fenley’s adorable videos in her Christmas series.

Have a wonderful holiday!!!!

 

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4 comments on “Fab Finds in Genealogy for the Week of December 18, 2011

  1. Pingback: Fab Finds in Genealogy for the Week of 25 December 2011 | 1 Ancestry 2 Little Time

  2. Sheri Fenley on said:

    Thanks for the mention Lisa! I am so pleased that you enjoyed the videos.

  3. Pingback: Best of the Genea-Blogs | My Blog

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