Fab Finds in Genealogy for the Week of 1 January 2012

A toast to the year 2012 !.... Um brinde ao ano de 2012 !

Video:

It’s been a while, but we have new videos! About.com offers “How to Research Your Family Tree on the Internet,” and “What Are Patronymic Surnames,” the latter being near and infuriating dear to my heart.

The National Genealogical Society (NGS) offers a video by Dr. Thomas W. Jones which is the last segment in a series of interviews from their “Paths to the Past” production. The interview focuses on the NGS Quarterly.

News:

If you’re in PA this might be of interest to you: Army Heritage and Education Center offers free workshop on how military records can help unlock secrets of your family tree.

Here’s another reason to be researching your family history. In 1912 a Mary Barnes was sought for a $14,000 legacy. However, none of the Mary Barnes’ that applied for the stockpile was able to prove their lineage. Tsk, tsk. (The article implies that THE Mary Barnes is now going to let herself be known, but does not offer closure to the matter).

Discover magazine has jumped into the fray with a blog post on the 23andme.com “terms of use” controversy. If you’re not familiar with this yet, it is a interesting topic. The article gives additional links to some other posts by Your Genetic Genealogist. This was all over twitter a few days ago but has died down recently. Hmm.

The Douglas family in MO was reunited with 150 year old family bible by some good samaritans in GA. I love these stories. They make me dream of it happening to me some day.

Here’s a tear-jerker story of a family torn apart, with a heartwarming ending as cousins are reunited years later. The article ends with information about a new website set up to help similar families reunite:

“Robert also wants to help other separated families. To that end, he has established a nonprofit networking website, “I am a link,” or http://www.iamalink.com. The site will enable genealogical searches for survivors and their descendants — and hopefully bring about more joyous reconnections.”

Education:

Ancestry.com posted the following to their facebook page: Learn the ins-and-outs of crafting a solid search at Ancestry.com as family historian and Search Product Manager, Ancestry Anne, will answer a user question. Airing live @ 1:00PM EST and 10:00AM PST, Tuesday January 3, 20121. Now, I don’t know about you, but I am guessing I will not be around for 18,109 more years. I will definitely try to leave a message for my ancestors though. 

Geneabloggers:

Tamura Jones offers an excellent summary of genealogy in 2011. What do you think, is anything missing??

Adding to the New Year theme is Amy Coffin with the 10 Most Popular Blog Posts for 2011, and Randy Seaver’s Best of the Geneablogs for 2011.

2012 Resolutions:

Well, I can tell you I will NEVER, EVER, EVER (did I mention NEVER?) part with my genealogy books but the Denver Public Library is suggesting a resolution to clear out the genealogical clutter by donating to the Genealogy Collection. If you can do it, then more power to you. Mine will be buried with me.

A different type of genealogy research:

A new tool from the Surgeon General, My Family Health Portrait, allows you to

  • “Enter your family health history.
  • Print your family health history to share with family or your health care worker.
  • Save your family health history so you can update it over time.”

Events:

Get ready for 2012 in SL. The calendar for genealogists is available here. I hope to see you there!

 

 

 

 

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2 comments on “Fab Finds in Genealogy for the Week of 1 January 2012

  1. Amy Coffin on said:

    Thank you for the mention!

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